Re: design goals (was: Hello)



And the good basic book Wall Framing, only 183 pages. Including heading on
adobe and cob walls.
This might make a good garage - possibility of adding single or double
garage doors.
http://www.gardendome.com/rco_x1s_front.gif
http://www.gardendome.com/rco_x1s_isometric.gif
Ernie wrote:

> I have some big books on carpentry and building; Modern Carpentry, 590
> pages, Carpenter Library: Tools, Steel Square, Joinery- 368 pages, Math,
> Plans, Specs., 290 pages. I don't have any architectural construction
> experience - lazy bum that I am :[ , and it doesn't look easy from this
> end. I did do some commercial office drywall work. It is definitely not
> easy. Big sheets, working on stilts, sawing, sanding.  Some homes I've
> seen could not have been much easier than a dome to drywall.
> Several domes I make use right triangles exclusively. You can get these
> from a rectangle sheet by making a diagonal cut and have less waste.
> example: http://www.gardendome.com/models/gd3x1ez_model.JPG
> http://www.gardendome.com/GD3_X1_EZ_model_plans.html
> Also, working in Imperial measures must be much more difficult than
> metric. I used to have metric phobia myself. Then I started building
> things and had to learn to think in 16ths and 8ths of an inch etc. and
> converting fractions to decimal..decimals to fractions. It's not easy to
> find a metric tape measure. Converting to metric would probably create a
> renaissance too.
> Ernie
>
> Charles J Knight wrote:
>
> > > > At the moment, it involves measuring, calculating angles, almost
> > > > literally creating a new type of architecture.  Take away that
> > > difficulty
> > > > and I think there would be a dome renaissance.
> > >
> > > You took the words right out of my ... er... keyboard.
> > >
> > > Thank you, Chuck, for stating that so clearly.
> >
> > Well, just compare it to the ease with which we can build
> > a highly standardized stick-framed wall.
> >
> > Buy some 8 foot 2x4 lumber, and some stud length 2x4s.
> >
> > Lay down an 8 foot board as a footer, lay the studs at
> > right angles, nail them into the footer.  Top it off with a
> > header, nail it all together, and stand the wall vertically.
> >
> > The sheetrock is sized for this construction, too, so just
> > take 2 sheets of 4x8 sheetrock, nail/screw them on, and
> > you have a finished wall.  No cutting, no fitting, and hardly
> > any finish work.  A very elegant, if not overly sophisticated
> > system.
> >
> > By comparison, WE have to pull out the calculators,
> > multiply by chord factors, cut (wastefully for many sizes)
> > boards to length, figure out a way to join them at the
> > "corners," etc.
> >
> > Next we have to fugure out a way to finish the walls,
> > since sheetrock is a real pain, and the outside must be
> > sheathed and made watertight...not the simplest
> > proposition using traditional materials.  (I know about
> > elastomers and peel-n-stick roofing)
> >
> > It's not worth it!  Domes are too hard to build, for
> > the average person.
> >
> > Given this, I think a connector system that would allow
> > the use of plywood panels might be a good solution.
> > Sell them with plans for a dome, that make good use of
> > a 4x8 sheet of plywood.  (Simpsons sells "dutch dormer"
> > garden shed connectors and plans using this model)
> >
> > After all, most people just want a place to store their
> > lawnmower (garden shed?), and don't care about making
> > an architectural statement.
> >
> >      -- Chuck Knight
> >
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